Welding Electrodes Classification



A 5.1 Carbon Steel Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Covered Carbon Steel Arc Welding Electrodes – Example E7018-1

1. E designates an electrode.

2. The first two digits, in this case 70, indicate the minimum tensile strength of the deposited metal in the as-welded condition. For E7018-1, the minimum tensile strength is 70 ksi (70000 psi).

3. The third digit, in this case “1”, indicates the position in which satisfactory welds can be made.

a. “1” means the electrode is capable of satisfactory welds in all positions (ie. flat, vertical, overhead, & horizontal).

b. “2” indicates the electrode is only suited to flat position welding and to horizontal position welding of fillet welds.

c. “4” indicates the electrode is suitable for vertical-down welding and for other positions as described in AWS A5.1.

4. The last two digits taken together indicate the type current with which the electrode can be used, and the type of covering on the electrode. In the E7018-1. example, the number “8” identifies the electrode as suitable for AC or DC operation, with a predominantly lime (calcuim carbonate) coating. For other examples, see AWS Spec A5.1.


A 5.2 Carbon and Low Alloy Steel Rods for Oxyfuel Gas Welding

Carbon and Low Alloy Steel Rods for Oxyfuel Gas Welding – Example R60

1. The letter R at the beginning of each classification designation stands for rod.

2. The digits (45, 60, 65, and 100) designate a minimum tensile strength of the weld metal, in the nearest thousands of pounds per square inch, deposited in accordance with the test assembly preparation section of specification.

A 5.3 Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding – Example E1100

1 The letter E at the beginning of each classification designation stands for electrode.

2 The numerical portion of the designation in this specification corresponds to the Aluminum Association composition of the core wire used in the electrode. In the case of E1100 it is commercially pure aluminum

A 5.4 Stainless Steel Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Covered Corrosion-Resisting Chromium and Chromium-Nickel Steel Welding Electrodes – Example E3O9LMo-16

1. The letter E at the beginning of each number indicates an electrode.

2. The first three digits of the classification indicate composition. In a few cases the number of digits may vary but composition is still indicated.

3. Letters may follow the digits to indicate specific alloy additions. In the case of the example, the letters “L” and “Mo” refer to a low carbon grade with a 2.0 to 3.0% molybdenum addition.

4. The last two digits of the classification indicate use with respect to position of welding and type of current. The smaller sizes of electrodes (up to and including 5/32 in. [ mm]) included in this specification are used in all welding

A 5.5 Low Alloy Steel Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Low Alloy Steel Covered Arc Welding Electrodes – Example E8018-B2L

1. The letter E designates an electrode

2. The first two digits (or three digits of a five digit number) designate the minimum tensile strength of the deposited metal in 1000 psi. For example E8018-B2L has a minimum tensile strength of 80000 psi.

3. The third digit (or fourth digit of a five digit number) indicates the position in which satisfactory welds can be made with the electrode.

a. “1” means the electrode is satisfactory for use in all positions (flat, vertical, overhead, & horizontal).

b. “2” indicates the electrode is suitable for the flat position and for horizontal fillet welds.

4. The last two digits, taken together, indicate the type current for the electrode and the type of covering on the electrode.

5. A letter suffj.x, such as Al, designates the chemical composition of the deposited weld metal.

A 5.6 Covered Copper and Copper Alloy Arc Welding Electrodes

Copper and Copper Alloy Covered Electrodes – Example ECuNi

1. The letter E at the beginning of each number indicates a covered electrode

2. The chemical symbol Cu identifies the electrode as a copper-base alloy

3. Additional chemical symbols such as the Ni in ECuNi indicate the principal alloying elements of each classification or classification group.

4. If more than one classification is included for an alloy group, individual classifications are identified by the suffix letters A, B, C, etc., as in ECuSn-A.

5. Further subdivision within an alloy group is achieved using a numeral after the suffix letter (eg. the 2 in ECuAI-A2.)

A 5.7 Copper and Copper Alloy Bare Welding Rods and Electrodes

Copper and Copper Alloy Bare Welding Rods and Electrodes – Example ERCuNi

1. The letters ER at the beginning of a classification indicate that the bare filler metal may be used either as an electrode or as a welding rod.

2. The chemical symbol Cu is used to identify the filler metals as copper base alloys.

3. Additional chemical symbols such as the Ni in ERCuNi indicate the principal alloying elements of each classification or classification group.

4. If more than one classification is included for an alloy group, individual classifications are identified by the suffix letters A, B, C, etc., as in ERCuSn-A.

5. Further subdivision within an alloy group is achieved using a numeral after the suffix letter (eg. the 2 in ERCUA1-A2).

A 5.8 Filler Metal for Brazing and Braze Welding

Filler Metals For Brazing and Braze Welding – Examples BCu-P, RBCuZn-A, BVAg-32 Brazing filler metals are standardized into eight alloy systems: silver, precious metals, aluminum-silicon, copper-phosphorus, copper and copper-zinc, nickel, cobalt, and magnesium filler metals. The primary alloy system is identified according to chemical symbol.

1. At the beginning of the classification

a. “R” indicates a brazing filler metal

b. “RB” indicates that the filler metal is suitable as a welding rod and as a brazing filler metal

c. “BV” indicates a “vacuum grade” filler metals for use in some electronic devices.

2. The letters ifilowing trhe “B”, “RB” or “BV” are chemical symbols representing the primary alloy composition. CuP in the example refers to a copper-phosphorus alloy.

3. Suffix numerals are used to indicate a particular chemical analysis within an alloy group.

4. A grade suffix is added after any suffix numerals for vacuum grade filler metals as follows:

a. Grade 1 indicates the most stringent requirements on the emitter impurities

b. Grade 2 indicates less stringent requirements on emitter impurities

A 5.9 Bare Stainless Steel Welding Electrodes and Rods

Bare Stainless Steel Welding Electrodes and Rods – Example ER309LMo

1. The first two letters of the classification may be:

a. ER for solid wires that may be used as electrodes or rods;

b. EC for composite cored or stranded wires; or

c. EQ for strip electrodes

2. The first three digist of the classification indicate composition. In a few cases, the number of digits may vary but still composition is still indicated.

3. Letters may follow the digits to indicate specific alloy additions. In the case of the example, the letters “L” and “Mo” refer to low carbon grade with a 2.0 to 3.0% molybdenum addition.

A 5.10 Bare Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy Welding Electrodes and Rods

Bare Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy Welding Electrodes and Rods- Examples ER4043, R5356, R-C855M

1. Letters at the beginning of the classification have the following meaning:

a. “ER” indicates suitablility as an electrode or a rod

b. “R” indicates suitability as welding rod

c, A “C” or “A” following the “R” or “ER” is part of the Aluminum Association designation for castings.

2. The four digit number following the leading letters indicate the alloy designation of the Aluminum Association.

A 5.11 Nickel and Nickel Alloy Welding Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Nickel and Nickel Alloy Welding Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding – Example ENiCrMo-3

1. The letter “E” at the beginning of each classification stands for electrode.

2. The chemical ymbo1 “Ni” appears right after the “E” to identify the electrodes as nickel base alloys.

3. Other chemical symbols such as Cr, Cu, Fe, Mo, and Co may follow the “Ni” to group electrodes according to their principal alloying elements.

4. After the chemical symbols, a suffix number is used to identify specific alloys within the same alloy group (eg.

ENiMo-1 and ENiMo-3). The numbers are not repeated within the same group.

A 5.12 Tungsten and Tungsten-Alloy Electrodes for Arc Welding and Cutting

Tungsten And Tungsten Alloy Electrodes For Arc Welding And Cutting -Example EWTh-2

1. The first letter in the designation ,“E”, indicates electrode.

2. The following letter “W” indicates that the electrode is primarily tungsten

3. The next letters, “P”, “Th”, or “Zr” indicate pure tungsten, thoriated tungsten, or zirconiated tungsten, respectively.

4. The numeral at the end of some classifications indicates a different chemical composition or product within the specific groups For example, the “2” in EWTh-2 indicates a 2% thoriated tungsten electrode

A 5.13 Surfacing Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Solid Surfacing Welding Rods and Electrodes – Examples RFe5-A, ERCuA1-A2

1. Letters at the beginning of the classification have the following meaning:

a. “ER” indicates suitability as an electrode or a rod b. “R” indicates suitability as a welding rod

2. Chemical symbols such as Cr, Cu, Fe, Mo, and Co identify principal alloying elements.

3. Suffix letters and numbers identify specific chemical compositions within the primary alloy system.

A 5.14 Nickel and Nickel Alloy Bare Welding Electrodes and Rods

Nickel and Nickel Alloy Bare Welding Electrodes and Rods – Examples ERN1Cu-7, ERN1CrMo-3,f

1. “ER” at the beginning of each classification indicates that the filler metal may be used as an electrode or a rod.

2. The chemical symbol “Ni” right after the ER identifies the filler metal as a nickel-base alloy.

3. Other symbols such as Cr, Cu, Fe, and Mo group the ifiler metals according to their principal alloying elements.

4. After the chemical symbols, a suffix number is used to identif separate compositions within the same group (eg. ERNiMo-1 and ERNiMo-3). The numbers are not repeated within the same group.

A 5.15 Welding Electrodes and Rods for Cast Iron

Welding Electrodes and Rods for Cast Iron – Examples ENiFe-CI-A, ENiCu-B, RCI-A

1. At the beginning of each classification:

a. “E” stands for electrode;

b. “ER” for a filler metal which is suitable for use as either an electrode or a rod, and

c. “R” at the beginning of each classification designation stands for welding rod.

2. The next letters in the filler metal designation are based on the chemical composition of the filler metal or undiluted weld metal. Thus, NiFe is a nickel-iron alloy, NiCu is a nickel-copper alloy, etc.

3. Following the chemical symbols

a. a “CI” to indicate that the filler is intended for cast iron applications

b. an “St” to indicate that the filler metal is intended for steel application.

c. a “T” is used to indicate a tubular electrode for FCAW and the number after the T indicates whether an external shielding gas is required.

(Note that the “CI” and “St” are intended to eliminate confusion with filler metal classifications from other specifications, which are designed for alloys other than cast irons. Two exceptions to this rule are XXXX-A and XXXX-B, where the “A” and “B” indentifiers preceded the introduction of “CI” in the specification.)

4. Where it is necessary to differentiate composition limits of filler metals within the same alloy family , suffix letters such as “A” or “B” are used, as in ENiCu-A and ENiCu-B.

A 5.16 Titanium and Titanium Alloy Bare Welding Rods and Electrodes

Titanium and Titanium Alloy Welding Rods and Electrodes – Examples ERTi-2, ERTi-6ELI

1. The letter “E” at the beginning of each classification stands for electrode, and the letter “R” stands for welding rod.

Since these filler metals are used as electrodes in gas metal arc welding and as rods in gas tungsten arc welding, both letters are used.

2. The chemical symbol “Ti” is used to identify the filler metals as unalloyed titanium or a titanium-base alloy.

3. The numeral following the “Ti” chemical symbol identifies different alloy compositions, and follows the equivalent grade designation of ASTM/ASME specifications for the corresponding base metal. ERTi-15 is an exception to the rule.

In the absence of an ASTM/ASME grade number in general usage for Ti-GAI-2CblTalMo, the number 15 was arbitrarily assigned to this classification of filler metal.

4. The letters “ELI” at the end of some classifications indicates extra low interstitial content (ie. carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen).
A 5.17 Carbon Steel Electrodes and Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding

Carbon Steel Electrodes and Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding – Examples F6AO-EH14, F7P6-EM12K, and F7P4-EC1

Understanding of the classification method requires separation of the classification into two components:

1. a flux component; and

2. an electrode component

Fluxes are classified before the hyphen, on the basis of the mechanical properties of the weld metal they produce with a given classification of electrode, under the specific test conditions called for the specification.

1. “F” designates a flux.

2. The next single digit represents the minimum tensile strength required of the weld metal in increments of 10000 psi.

3. The third digit is a letter “A” or “P” indicating that the weld metal was tested and classified in the as-welded condition

(A) or postweld heat treated condition (P).

4. The digit following the A or P refers to impact testing requirements of weld metal deposited with the flux. A “Z” indicates that no impact requirement is specified. A number indicates that the weld metal satisfies the required 20 ft-lb (27 Joule)

Charpy V-notch impact strength at test temperatures given by the digit as follows:

0 = 0°F (-18°C), 2 = -20°F (-29°C), 4 = -40°F (-40°C), 5 = -50°F (-46°C),

6 = -60°F (-51°C), and 8 = -80°F (-62°C).

Electrodes are classified after the hyphen , and represent the filler metal with which the flux will deposit weld metal meeting the specified mechanical properties when tested as called for in the’ specification.

1. The letter “E” at the beginning of each classification stands for electrode. The letters EC indicate composite electrode.

2. For solid electrodes, the remainder of the designation indicates the chemical composition of the electrode where:

a. “L” indicates that the solid electrode is comparatively low in manganese content.

b. “M” indicates a medium manganese content

c. “H” indicates a comparatively high manganese content.

For composite electrodes, the classification is based upon low dilution weld metal obtained with a particular flux. The numerical suffix following the “EC” refers to composition group.

3. For solid electrodes, the one or two digits after the manganese designator refer to the electrode nominal carbon content.

4. The letter “K”, which appears in some designations, indicates that the electrode is made from a heat of silicon-killed

A 5.18 Carbon Steel Electrodes and Rods for Gas Shielded Arc Welding

Carbon Steel Electrodes and Rods Gas Shielded Arc Welding – Example ER7OS-2

1. At the beginning of the classification

a. “E” designates an electrode

b. “ER” indicates that the bare filler metal may be used as an electrode or welding rod.

2. The next two digit number indicates th required minimum tensile strength of the weld metal in multiples of 1000 psi.

3. “S”designates a bare, solid electrode or rod.

4. The suffix number refers to the, specific chemical composition shown in the specification.

A 5.19 Magnesium Alloy Welding Electrodes and Rods

Specification For Magnesium Alloy Welding Electrodes and Rods

1. The prefix R indicates that the material is suitable for use as a welding rod and the prefix E indicates suitability as an electrode. Since some of these ifiler metals are used as electrodes in gas metal arc welding and as welding rods in oxyfuel or gas tungsten arc welding, both letters may be used.

2. Chemistry is established on the basis of ASTM B 275, Codification of Certain Nonferrous Metals and Alloys, Cast and Wrought.
A 5.20 Carbon Steel Electrodes for Flux Cored Arc Welding

Carbon Steel Electrodes for Flux Cored Arc Welding – Example E70T-6

1. “E” designates an electrode.

2. The first digits, in this case “7”, indicates the minimum tensile strength of the deposited metal. For E70T-6, the minimum tensile strength is 70 ksi (70000 psi).

3. The third digit, in this case “0”, indicates the primary welding position for which the electrode is designed.

a. “0” indicates flat and horizontal positions.

b. “1” indicates all positions.

4. “T” stands for tubular, indicating a flux cored electrode.

5. The numerical suffix after the “T” is related to performance and operational Gharacteristics of the electrode, which can be determined from the appendix to AWS A5.20.

A 5.21 Bare Electrodes and Rods for Surfacing

Composite Surfacing Welding Rods and Electrodes

To understand the A5.21 classification system, one must first identif two main groups of filler metal:

1. high-speed steels, austenitic manganese steels, and austenitic high chromium irons,

2. tungsten-carbide classifications,

For high-speed steels, austenitic manganese steels, and austenitic high chromium irons, classification examples include RFe5-B and EFeMn-A. The classification system follows:

1. “E” at the beginning of each classification indicates an electrode, “R” indicates a welding rod.

2. Letters immediately after the “E” or “R” are the chemical symbols to group the principal elements in the classification.

Thus FeMn is an iron -manganese steel, and FeCr is an iron-chromium alloy, etc.

3. Where more than one clasification is included in a basic group, the individual classifications in the group are identified by the letters A, B, etc., as in EFeMn-A.

4. Further subdividing within an alloy group is done by using a 1, 2, etc., after the last letter.

For tungsten-carbide rods, classification examples include RWC-12/20, RWC-30, EWC2O/30 and EWC-40. The classification system is described below.

1. The letters “R” and “E” at the beginning of each classification indicate welding rod and welding electrode, respectively.

2. The “WC” immediately after the “R” or “E” indicates that the filler metal consists of a mild steel tube filled with granules of fused tungsten-carbide.

3. The numbers following the “WC” indicate the mesh size limits for the tungsten- carbide granules. For two numbers separated by a slash, the number preceding the slash indicates the sieve size through which the particles must pass, and the number following the slash indicates the sieve size on which the particles are held. Where only one sieve size is shown, this indicates the size of the screen through which the granules must pass.

A 5.22 Stainless Steel Electrodes for Flux Cored Arc Welding and Stainless Steel Flux Cored Rods for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

Flux Cored Corrosion-Resisting Chromium and Chromium-Nickel Steel Electrodes -

Examples E308T-2 and E316LT-2

1. “E” designates an electrode

2. “T” stands for tubular, indicating a flux cored electrode

3. Digits and letters between the “E” and the “T” indicate chemical composition.

4. The suffix after the “T” indicates the shielding medium intended for welding:

a. “1” = carbon dioxide gas plus a flux system.

b. “2” = a mixture of argon with 2 percent oxygen plus a flux system.

c. “3” = self-shielding, with no external shielding gas required.

d. “G” = an electrode with unspecified method of shielding. Properties must be obtained from the manufacturer
A 5.23 Low Alloy Steel Electrodes and Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding

Low Alloy Steel Electrodes and Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding -

Example F7PO-EL12-Al, F8A4-EA2-A2, F9A1O-EA4-A4.

Understanding of the classification method requires separation of the classification into three components:

1. a flux component;

2. an electrode component; and

3. a weld metal chemistry component.

Fluxes are classified before the first hyphen, on the basis of the mechanical properties of the weld metal they produce with a given classification of electrode, under the specific test conditions called for in the specification.

1. “F” designates a flux.

2. The one or two digits after “F” represent the minimum weld metal tensile strength in 10000 psi increments.

3. The third element of the flux classification is a letter “A” or “P” indicating that the weld metal was tested and classified in the as-welded condition (A) or postweld heat treated condition (P).

4. The digit that follows the A or P will be either a “Z” indicating that no impact test requirement is specified, or a digit indicating that the weld metal satisfies the required 20 ft-lb (27 Joule) Charpy V-notch impact strength at the test temperature indicated by the digit where:

0 = 0°F (-18°C), 2 = -20°F (-29°C), 4 = -40°F (-40°C), 5 = -50°F (-46°C), 6 = -60°F (-51°C), 8 = -80°F (-62°C).

The central part of the classification (eg. EL12, ENi3, ECB3. or ECM1O, refers to the electrode classification with which the flux will produce weld metal that meets the specified mechanical properties when tested as called for in the specification.

1. “E” at the beginning of each classification stands for electrode. The letters.”EC” indicate composite electrode.

2. The remaining letters and numbers indicate the chemical composition of the electrode, or, in the case of composite electrodes, of the undiluted weld metal obtained with a particular flux.

a. For the EL12 and EM12K classifications, chemical composition requirements are the same as AWS A5.17.

b. For other electrodes, compositions are shown in Table 1 of the specification.

c. “N” indicates the electrode is intended for nuclear applications.

d. “G” indicates the filler metal is of a “general” classification. It allows space for a useful filler metal, which otherwise would have to wait for revision of the specification to be classified. Consequently, two filler metals bearing the “G” classification, may be quite different in some respect such as chemical composition.

The final component of the classification (eg. Al, A2, A4) refers to the chemical composition requirements for undiluted weld metal, which may be obtained from Table 2 of the specification.

A 5.24 Zirconium and Zirconium Alloy Bare Welding Electrodes and Rods

Zirconium and Zirconium Ahoy Welding Electrodes and Rods – Example ERZr3

1. “ER” at the beginning of each designation indicates that the filler metal used as a welding electrode or rod.

2. “Zr” indicates that the filler metals have a zirconium base.

3. The characters following the “Zr” chemical symbol identify the composition of the filler metal (see specification). may be nominal
A 5.25 Carbon and Low Alloy Steel Electrodes and Fluxes for Electroslag Welding

Carbon And Low Alloy Steel Electrodes And Fluxes For Electroslag Welding – Examples FES6O-EH14-EW, FES72-EWT2

Understanding of the classification method requires separation of the classification into two components:

1. a flux component; and

2. an electrode component.

Fluxes are classified before the first hyphen (eg. FES6O, FES72), on the basis of the mechanical properties of the weld metal they produce with a given classification of electrode, under the specific test conditions called for in the specification.

1. “FES” designates a flux for lectro welding.

2. The digit after “FES” represents the minimum weld metal tensile strength in 10000 psi increments.

3. The digit after the strength designator will be either a “Zn indicating that no impact test requirement is specified, or a digit indicating that the weld metal satisfies the required 15 ft-lb (20 Joule) Charpy V-notch impact strength at the test temperature indicated by the digit where: 0 = 0°F (-18°C), 2 = -20°F (-29°C), 4 = -40°F (-40°C), 5 = -50°F (-46°C), 6 = -60°F (-51°C), 8 = -80°F (-62°C).

Electrodes are classified after the first hypen (eg. EH14-EW, EWT2), on the basis of chemical composition.

1. “E” at the beginning of each classification stands for electrode.

2. The remaining letters and numbers indicate the chemical composition of the electrode, or, in the case of composite electrodes, of the undiluted weld metal obtained with a particular flux.

a. “M” indicates medium manganese content.

b. “H” indicates high manganese content.

c. Digits following the M or H indicate the nominal carbon content of the electrode.

d. “K”, when present, indicates that the electrode is made from a silicon killed steel.

e. “EW” indicates a solid wire electrode.

c. “WT” indicates a composite electrode.

d. “G” indicates the filler metal is of a “general” classification. It allows space for a useful filler metal, which otherwise would have to wait for revision of the specification to be classified. Consequently, two filler metals bearing the “G” classification, may be quite different in some respect such as chemical composition.

A 5.26 Carbon and Low Alloy Steel Electrodes and Fluxes for Electrogas Welding

Carbon And Low Alloy Steel Electrodes For Electrogas Welding – Example EG62S-1

1. “EG” at the beginning of each classification indicates that the electrode is intented for lectogas welding.

2. The first digit following the “EG” represents the minimum tensile strength of the weld metal in units of 10000 psi.

3. The next letter, either an “S” or a “T”, indicates that the electrode is solid (S) or composite flux cored or metal cored (T).

4. The designators after the hyphen refer to chemical composition of the electrode, or, in the case of composite electrodes, of the undiluted weld metal obtained with a particular flux, and the type or absence of shielding gas. A “G” indicates the filler metal is of a “general” classification. It allows space for a useful filler metal, which otherwise would have to wait for revision of the specification to be classified. Consequently, two filler metals bearing the “G”

A 5.27 Low Alloy Steel Electrodes for Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Copper and Copper Alloy Gas Welding Rods -

Examples RCuZn-C, ERCu, and RBCuZn-D

1. “R”, “ER”, and “RB” at the beginning of each classification indicates that the welding consumable may be an oxyfuel gas welding rod, either an electrode or brazing filler metal, and either a welding rod or a brazing ifiler metal.

2. “Cu” is used to identify the welding rods as copper-base alloys and the additional chemical symbols indicates the principal alloying element of each group.

3. Where more than one classification is included in a basic group, the individual classifications in the group are identified by the letters “A”, “B”, “C,” etc.
A 5.28 Low Alloy Steel Electrodes for Flux Cored Arc Welding

Low Alloy Steel Filler Metals – Examples ER80S-B2 and E80C-B2.

1. “E”designates an electrode, as in other specifications. “ER” at the beginning of a classification indicates that the filler metal may be used as an electrode or a welding rod.

2. The number 80 indicates the required minimum tensile strength of weld metal in multiples of 1000 psi. Three digits are used for weld metal of 100 000 psi tensile strength and higher.

3. “S” designates a bare solid electrode or rod, while “C” designates a composite metal cored or stranded electrode.

4. The suffix B2 indicates a particular classification based on as-manufactured chemical composition.

A 5.29 Consumable Inserts

Low Alloy Electrodes for Flux Cored Arc Welding -

Examples E80T5-B2L, E100T5-D2, E120T5-K4

1. “E” stands for electrode.

2. The digit or digits between the “E” and the first digit before the “T” indicates the minimum tensile strength of the deposited metal in increments of 10000 psi.

3. The digit immediately before the “T” indicates the primary welding position for which the electrode is designed.

a. “0” indicates flat and horizontal positions. b. “1” indicates all positions.

4. “T” stands for tubular, indicating a flux cored electrode.

5. The numerical suffix after the “T” is related to performance and operational characteristics of the electrode, which can be determined from the appendix to AWS A5.29.

A 5.30 Fluxes for Brazing and Braze Welding

Consumable Inserts – Example 1N308

1. The prefix “IN” designates a consumable insert.

2. The numbers 308 designate the chemical composition.

Note that, while the solid products are classified on the basis of chemical composition, their cross-sectional configurations are another consideration that must be selected and. specified when ordering.

A 5.31 Welding Shielding Gases

Fluxes For Brazing And Braze Welding

a. “FB” indicates Flux for brazing or braze Welding

b. The third character refers to group of applicable base metals as listed in the standard.

c. A fourth character represents a change in form and attendant composition, within the broader base metal